Samburu, too

I got sidetracked in the first blog so this one will be primarily predators and a few other things.  I’m many of you have seen the documentary of the bittersweet story of the lioness that adopted an antelope calf.  It died, of course, because she couldn’t care for it.  She subsequently adopted another. This is a picture of the sign that is at the entrance to the reserve.  

IMG_0361 

IMG_0598

IMG_0362

The pictures of these two young brothers clearly show how skinny they are.  They are not hunting.  The belief is that during the period that their mother would have taught them how to hunt was during the drought and carcasses were abundant so not as much hunting was necessary.  Their mother had recently left them on their own. The researcher working with lions here has kept in close contact with the ranger.  They still appeared to be well so she wasn’t going to interfere at that time.  If they did need to intervene, they would have wounded an impala and brought it close to the boys.  Obviously, no one wants to have to do that.  However, apparently (after we left), their mother reappeared.  It was hoped that she will hunt for them and perhaps jump start their instinct to hunt.  Stephen kept us up to date until it was time to go our separate ways.  His intention is to let us know when he returns, what has happened.  But given the dire straits that the large predators are in, they will not let it go.  I hope that they don’t have to artificially intervene…

 IMG_9931

IMG_9933

IMG_9934 

IMG_9935

IMG_9936

And of course, the leopard in the tree….

 IMG_9829

IMG_9830

IMG_9831 

 IMG_9833 

IMG_9835

IMG_9836

IMG_9832

IMG_9837  

  IMG_9839

IMG_9838

As you can see, he wasn’t happy about our presence so we left.  We found him a couple of days later.  This time he really didn’t seem to care.

IMG_9994 

    IMG_9998

It wasn’t until we got to the Mara that I saw cheetahs up close and  personal…..One of my wishes for this trip.

IMG_0257

IMG_0274

IMG_0260

We nearly drove past these little dwarf mongoose.  They were difficult to photograph because they move so quickly.

IMG_9898

IMG_9895

I didn’t see nearly as many jackals as I did in Botswana.  Of course, that could have been because the grass was quite high.  They really are quite small.

IMG_0341

IMG_0334 

IMG_0337

IMG_0699

And vervet monkeys, of course.

IMG_0665

Can’t ignore those warthogs. :-))

 IMG_0135

IMG_0136 

I still haven’t done elephants yet, so I’ll add one more.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Samburu, too

  1. Oh, those warties always make me smile. It must have been a big thrill to see the leopard and cheetah. I hope the lion brothers will be O.K.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s