On the way to Rwanda

We crossed the equator on the way to Rwanda.  We stopped for a few photos but they must be on my little camera which I haven’t downloaded yet.

These photos are the crowned crane which happen to be the the national bird of Uganda.  This was the only time we saw them.  I think I probably saw more of them in Kenya last year.  I love not only their ‘crown’ but the way their feathers lay on their body.

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The boundary between the park and land used by the people is startlingly obvious!

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from our lodge in Rwanda..DPP_0481

That’s it.. next are the two gorilla treks in Rwanda.  But it will have to wait a couple of days. 

There’s one thing I want you to know about that isn’t in any photographs.  Because of the creation of the park, people had to leave the forests which were home to many people, particularly the Batwa.. what we used to call Pygmy.  I absolutely agree that some of these forests had to be set aside to preserve what was left of the mountain gorilla population who otherwise would have faced extinction.  But one of the unfortunate consequences of this was what has happened to the Batwa.  They are vilified by many of the other tribes of the countries that share these forests.  They are often treated as second class citizens and face terrible discrimination.  There are people and organizations that are attempting to help them improve their status and success in the communities they find themselves in.  Nevertheless, it is a sad situation and reminds me of what Native Americans have experienced here in the United States.  Actually, I know there are similar situations all over the world. I just wonder if we’ll ever learn……

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One thought on “On the way to Rwanda

  1. It’s a beautiful bird the Crowned Crane.
    I cannot agree more about the strikingly obvious boundary line between the national park and the land. It’s even more obvious when you are trekking it and the drop in temperature as you hit the forest.

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