Gibb’s Farm; Manyara Ranch; Maasai village; women’s co-op

We made a one night stop at this place.  It is a working farm, besides being a bit of luxury in the hills close to the Ngorogoro crater.  It is owned by Thompson’s Safaris and is quite a contrast to the simple camps in the parks. This will be a relatively short entry compared to the others. 

This moth posed for photos right over a busy doorway.  It was a giant, bigger even than this photo!

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I mentioned this was a working farm, that that it is.  I went to see the ‘farm yard’.  They were about to feed the pigs.  And although it was fun to see them, and the piglets, I’m sure you know what the outcome is for some of them.  I arrived just as the pigs were being fed.  This sow was having difficulty being patient.

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The young man tending the chickens was quite enthusiastic and talked to us for quite a while about raising chickens.  This fellow was named Obama!

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Clearly one of Obama’s offspring!

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This is the entrance to my own private chalet.  Each chalet has a name.

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Here’s the name of mine… sheesh!!  I’m not a wedding person!

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Outdoor shower… nice.

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While exploring the grounds I quickly felt like I was Hawaii…

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A weaver’s nest needing repair and getting it.

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coffee bean plants.. I thoroughly enjoyed plenty of Tanzanian coffee on this trip.

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This is a lesser bushbaby.  They put out a tasty tidbits and this little one comes everynight to eat.  While we were watching, it suddenly decided it was done and instead of retreating back up the way it came, it took a flying leap right past us into nearby trees.DPP_2917

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On our way into the crater we made a couple of stops.  Manyara Ranch is a conservation area that serves as a wildlife corridor.  We visited a camp for a quick break and also visited a school that AWF has assisted with funding.  I have seen several schools on my visits to Africa and each one has been a delight.  The children are always so incredibly cheerful.

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The school with our guys..

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It’s a boarding school but even so, these kids put on their uniforms and did a bit of singing for us.

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We had also stopped at a women’s co-op.  One of our group was instrumental in funding this project.  From the money these women earn from selling their product, they are able to support themselves and achievement independence.  It was an honor to support them.

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Always love photographing kids….

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We also visited a Masaai cultural village.  Far off in the distance is where they actually live.

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Maasai men are well known for their jumping dance.

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People are always invited to participate. 

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This is the woman who dragged me into the dance.  They put a few of their beautiful beadwork on you.  I bought this piece because it was one of several that I wore.  And this is the woman who persuaded me to dance with them.  I asked the young man who had them to take me to her so I could take a photo of her.  She gave me a little bracelet.

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More children, of course!  They allowed us in the ‘kindergarten’ room.  These little people were very enthusiastic about showing us what they knew.

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The children are, of course, irresistible!  It was time to move on to the crater itself.

3 thoughts on “Gibb’s Farm; Manyara Ranch; Maasai village; women’s co-op

  1. What a nice surprise to find this unexpected blog. Gibbs Farm looks absolutely lovely and I shouldn’t rule it out if and when I ever visit the area again. I like the way your likened it to Hawaii, it certainly looked very lush.
    Wonderful images of the Massai males and females and I am so pleased you bought a necklace. I have to tell you that there were a few men wearing my Massai blankets that I have draped over my lounge chairs. Such great colours with the amazing contrast of the lush green background.
    Thanks for the surprise Nancy, I wasn’t expecting it this evening.

  2. yeah.. I decided to separate it from the crater post since it really was stuff that happened on the way. I do love the colors of the Maasai cloth. It’s hard not to feel cheerful and happy with all those wonderful colors everywhere.

  3. Although I so love the animals, this was really interesting.  The room you had and that bath tub.  I never take baths, always showers but that looked really nice. 

    I love the colorful way they dress.  They seem so happy. 

    >________________________________ > From: My Africa >To: manschell@yahoo.com >Sent: Saturday, March 15, 2014 12:26 AM >Subject: [New post] Gibb’s Farm; Manyara Ranch; Maasai village; women’s co-op > > > > WordPress.com >nancy posted: “We made a one night stop at this place.  It is a working farm, besides being a bit of luxury in the hills close to the Ngorogoro crater.  It is owned by Thompson’s Safaris and is quite a contrast to the simple camps in the parks. This will be a ” >

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