Ngorogoro Crater, part 2

.zebras enjoying life

DPP_3291DPP_3293DPP_3294

DPP_3295

DPP_3296

This zebra’s tongue was out a lot… perhaps giving someone the raspberry.

DPP_3299DPP_3300DPP_3301DPP_3302DPP_3303DPP_3304DPP_3305DPP_3306DPP_3307

DPP_3308

I have not had a close up view of zebra stripes on the belly before.  Zebra stripes are endlessly fascinating.

DPP_3309DPP_3310

DPP_3311

DPP_3312DPP_3313DPP_3314DPP_3315DPP_3316

DPP_3318

 

DPP_3323

DPP_3324DPP_3325DPP_3326

Still talking.  What a day it must be!

DPP_3330DPP_3331DPP_3332

Okay… this will get a bit ridiculous.  You probably wonder what all the fuss is about.  I have seen many kori bustards.  They happen to be the heaviest flying bird in the world.  Needless to say, I have rarely seen one flying.  Must be a lot of work.  But I’ve never seen a male in full display mode.  There were several males around and they all were puffed up and strutting.  I don’t think I ever did see a female.  They must have been around… or maybe they were just practicing…!

DPP_3334DPP_3335DPP_3338DPP_3343DPP_3346

And there goes the tail!

DPP_3348DPP_3349DPP_3351DPP_3353DPP_3355DPP_3357

DPP_3365DPP_3371DPP_3372DPP_3373DPP_3377DPP_3378DPP_3380DPP_3381DPP_3382DPP_3465

DPP_3461DPP_3462

As you can see, it is still misty out so photos of wildlife in the distance aren’t very clear.  But we were very excited to see so many rhinos, even at a distance.  Black rhino are more solitary than the white rhino so it was a treat to see several together.

DPP_3470DPP_3472DPP_3475DPP_3476DPP_3481

DPP_3491

Then we watched the buffalo for a while.

DPP_3484

DPP_3485DPP_3486DPP_3487

Then way back beyond the buffalo we spotted this female black rhino and realized she was headed our way.

DPP_3492DPP_3495

DPP_3497

So you’re going to see a ridiculous number of photos of this girl because I didn’t know if and when she was going to turn away.

DPP_3504

DPP_3506

DPP_3509

DPP_3511

DPP_3512DPP_3513DPP_3514DPP_3515DPP_3516DPP_3519DPP_3523

DPP_3526DPP_3529DPP_3531DPP_3532DPP_3533DPP_3534DPP_3536

DPP_3537DPP_3538

Then we realized she was going to cross the road!

DPP_3541DPP_3542DPP_3543

Along with her oxpecker companions…

DPP_3546DPP_3549DPP_3550DPP_3552DPP_3556DPP_3558DPP_3560DPP_3561DPP_3562

DPP_3564DPP_3566DPP_3567DPP_3568

This old gal has been around a while.  One of our group is certain she’s seen this rhino before, the recognition coming when her ‘docked’ tail became apparent.DPP_3569

DPP_3570DPP_3571DPP_3572

DPP_3575

DPP_3577DPP_3578DPP_3579DPP_3581DPP_3583

DPP_3584DPP_3586

And away she goes… Shortly after we pulled up a couple of other vehicles did as well.  And just after that, a vehicle with several rangers pulled up and blocked part of the road to keep people from trying to move up closer and crowd her.  Their presence clearly helped keep everyone in ‘polite mode’.  It was exciting to see a black rhino up fairly close and one that wasn’t running away!  So I appreciated the work of the rangers to protect the well being of the rhinos.

DPP_3587DPP_3588

I’m afraid that the remainder of this blog entry will follow my obsession for certain animals.  I tried to cut the photos that were near duplicates but it’s hard and it will still end up fairly lengthy. 

On to lions.  This lioness was clearly down for the count so we didn’t stick around too long and moved on to the boys.  Nothing does lazy like a lion…

DPP_3589

DPP_3592

DPP_3595DPP_3598

DPP_3599

One woke up!

DPP_3604

DPP_3605

DPP_3607

DPP_3610

DPP_3611

DPP_3614

DPP_3615

DPP_3617

DPP_3618

DPP_3619

DPP_3621DPP_3622DPP_3623

DPP_3624DPP_3626

DPP_3628

DPP_3632

DPP_3634DPP_3635DPP_3636

DPP_3638

DPP_3641

DPP_3643DPP_3644DPP_3645DPP_3646

DPP_3648

DPP_3649DPP_3650DPP_3652

DPP_3653

DPP_3655

Such brotherly love…

DPP_3656DPP_3658DPP_3659DPP_3660

DPP_3661

DPP_3662DPP_3664DPP_3665DPP_3666

About to cross the road…

DPP_3668DPP_3671DPP_3673DPP_3675DPP_3678

DPP_3681

He kept looking back to see if his brother was going to get off his lazy butt and move on.

DPP_3687

As you can see, he was in no big hurry to move on.

DPP_3691DPP_3692

DPP_3694

DPP_3696

DPP_3698DPP_3699DPP_3700

DPP_3702

DPP_3703DPP_3704

Finally, he manages to get himself going.

DPP_3706

DPP_3707

DPP_3709

DPP_3713DPP_3715DPP_3716DPP_3718DPP_3719

DPP_3725

DPP_3726

Bye, boys.. loved those manes.

DPP_3728

oops… pit stop…

DPP_3730

Seems like a good place to end part 2.  It’s getting too long again because I have such a hard time leaving stuff out.  And this is probably a tenth of what I have taken..

4 thoughts on “Ngorogoro Crater, part 2

  1. Wow, wow, wow. Because you ended with the lions I will start there. My God look at those manes. Absolutely breathtaking. Did your guide give you any idea how old these magnificent creatures were?

    Absolutely great shots, specifically 3304 of the Zebra being extraordinarily vocal. And then another having a roll. Shot 3313, I have only ever seen that when there has been plenty of dirt, not lush green grass.

    What an sight to see a Kori displaying. You were lucky again to be there at the right time. Just love the photos 3343, 3365 and 3462. I have never seen this.

    And the Rhino’s. Oh how fortunate you were to see so many together. And then have one decide to give you a rare treat and come so close.

    By this day, you must have been buzzing with anticipation of what you were going to see next.
    I do believe your statement in the previous blog about the Crater being likened to Zoo is very true.

  2. Thanks for your comments. I enjoy knowing which ones are your favorites. And although they didn’t know the ages of the lion brothers, they did say they were fairly young.. well, that’s all relative of course because it takes a few years for those manes to grow as big and full as those.

  3. I loved seeing the stripes on the Zebras belly.  I have even seen one laying down before.

    The lions laying on their back I also found fascinating too.  They reminded me of our greys cockroaching.  They all look so innocent in those postions.

    >________________________________ > From: My Africa >To: manschell@yahoo.com >Sent: Sunday, March 23, 2014 12:30 PM >Subject: [New post] Ngorogoro Crater, part 2 > > > > WordPress.com >nancy posted: “.zebras enjoying life This zebra’s tongue was out a lot… perhaps giving someone the raspberry. I have not had a close up view of zebra stripes on the belly before.  Zebra stripes are endlessly fascinating.   Still talki” >

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s