Serengeti, part 2

First a little scenery… believe me, these boulders are as big or bigger than I am, even as big as a house.  There are photos later that put it into perspective.

DPP_4249

DPP_4250

So many acacias…

DPP_4251

DPP_4253

So much space..

DPP_4255

DPP_4257DPP_4259

And then the not so pretty.. The big, the bad and the ugly.  I love them!

DPP_4263

DPP_4265DPP_4266DPP_4268DPP_4269DPP_4270

More wildebeest… but that’s pretty much why we are there…

DPP_4272

DPP_4274

DPP_4275

DPP_4277

DPP_4278

DPP_4279

DPP_4282

DPP_4284

DPP_4286

DPP_4289

DPP_4290

Although all the fresh green foliage was great for the animals, it did make sighting certain animals quite a bit harder.  This young cheetah was playing with its tail.  Occasionally the head would pop up or a tail would swish through the air.  The cheetah was enjoying itself immensely but this was all we ever saw of it.

DPP_4291

DPP_4293

DPP_4297

DPP_4298

DPP_4300

DPP_4301

DPP_4305

DPP_4306

DPP_4308

A resting giraffe.  Other than babies, I have rarely seen one resting on the ground.  Probably not the easiest position to be in when running from a predator is imminent!

DPP_4310

During the time allowed for lunch and rest between game drives, a couple of the guys offered to take us up the kopje behind the camp.  We were not allowed free access to the areas around camp but as long as we were escorted we did see a few things.

DPP_4337DPP_4338DPP_4340DPP_4341DPP_4343

DPP_4344

DPP_4345

DPP_4346

An agama lizard on the rock and the chairs around the fire pit at the bottom.

DPP_4347DPP_4349DPP_4350DPP_4351DPP_4353DPP_4365DPP_4366

DPP_4367

DPP_4370

DPP_4371

It’s easy to see how the stripes of zebra in a group would be confusing to a predator.  You can see the large wound on the leg of a young zebra.  It didn’t seem to interfere with movement and will likely heal leaving a large scar.  That’s one lucky baby!DPP_4321

DPP_4323DPP_4324DPP_4325

DPP_4326

Rocks certainly come in handy for a belly scratch!

DPP_4327DPP_4329DPP_4330DPP_4332DPP_4333

There’s our first lion on a kopje!!  He was actually fairly far away.

DPP_4374

Not too far from him we found the rest of the pride.  There are a couple of lionesses up there and a number of cubs.

DPP_4377DPP_4385

DPP_4387

DPP_4388

DPP_4391

DPP_4394

DPP_4398

DPP_4401

DPP_4404

DPP_4407DPP_4408DPP_4409DPP_4410

DPP_4412DPP_4413

Cute little bugger…

DPP_4414DPP_4416DPP_4417

DPP_4419

DPP_4421

DPP_4422

DPP_4424DPP_4425

DPP_4426DPP_4427DPP_4428DPP_4429DPP_4430

DPP_4432DPP_4434

More young hyenas.. I don’t think I’ve ever seen so many youngsters.

DPP_4475

DPP_4476

DPP_4478

DPP_4480

DPP_4483

DPP_4484DPP_4485DPP_4491

How is this not cute????

DPP_4492

We saw several leopards and this is about as close to any of them as we got.  We did see one that we could have seen much closer but from the time we saw him until we arrived at the spot we had sighted him, he managed to slink away through the long grass without a single disturbance to the grass and was long gone by the time we found the spot.

DPP_4525DPP_4528

We stopped at this ranger post which is dedicated to protecting the rhinos in the area.  We never did see any though.

DPP_4439DPP_4440

This representation of a rhino head shows how the radio is implanted in the horn.  Obviously, the horn isn’t sawed in half to put it there… Smile

DPP_4441DPP_4442

We took a walk up a kopje where a cave has some early Maasai paintings.  They been there for several hundreds of years.

DPP_4450

DPP_4443DPP_4444

DPP_4445DPP_4447DPP_4452

These white pocked marks are actually round depressions on the rock that the Maasai used to bang with another rock to make a ringing sound that could be heard across the plains.

DPP_4453

DPP_4456DPP_4462

DPP_4465

Our guides… they were with us throughout the entire trip (except for Ruaha).

DPP_4466

DPP_4468

Told you some of the boulders where big!  There were plenty more even larger.

DPP_4470

This is the main rock they used for ringing.  It truly was amazing.  I had no idea a big rock would make such a sound.

DPP_4473

Have no idea what this bird is but I like how the colors of the bird complement the colors surrounding the bird.

DPP_4532DPP_4533DPP_4535

This looks as if it could be the long crested eagle.  But I am not at all sure.

DPP_4538DPP_4539DPP_4541

This might be the eastern pale chanting hawk.. once again, I could be wrong.DPP_4540

DPP_4545

Even Africa has tiny shore birds and gulls.

DPP_4552DPP_4553DPP_4555DPP_4556DPP_4557DPP_4565DPP_4558DPP_4559DPP_4560DPP_4561DPP_4563DPP_4564

A red necked spur fowl.

DPP_4566DPP_4567DPP_4568

I’ve been trying to get  a decent photo of the common hoopoe for a long time.  They don’t hang around and pose like the rollers do.  But this guy stayed around long enough for some photos although I do wish we’d been closer.

DPP_4570DPP_4572DPP_4586DPP_4569

Buffalo weaver

DPP_4605DPP_4606DPP_4607

DPP_4609DPP_4610

The mist settles in the early morning light and creates this bluish purple landscape.

DPP_4498DPP_4501DPP_4503

 

Back on the road… this little guy was taking the easy way to find family.

DPP_4546DPP_4547DPP_4548

There’s mom… or some family member.

DPP_4549 

DPP_4551

Giraffe have such beautiful faces.. or perhaps its only in the eye of the beholder..

DPP_4588

Giraffe have the most amazing tongue.  It’s quite long, thick and very facile.  It would have to be to work around those spines on the acacia.

DPP_4590

DPP_4592DPP_4593

DPP_4595

DPP_4596DPP_4598DPP_4599DPP_4505DPP_4506DPP_4509DPP_4510

DPP_4513DPP_4514DPP_4516DPP_4517DPP_4519DPP_4520DPP_4521DPP_4522DPP_4523

So while we were watching this impala pair we noticed someone else was watching them as well…..

DPP_4612

Can you see it?DPP_4613

We watched them for a while.  The impala didn’t seem to realize the leopard was there but the leopard didn’t seem interested in doing anything but watch.

DPP_4614

These are bat eared fox.  Those big ears help them hear grubs and other insects under ground.  They dig them up.  I’ve seen them a few times and never have I ever seen only one.  If they’re resting, it’s always a pile.

DPP_4600DPP_4601DPP_4603DPP_4604DPP_4616

These are dwarf mongoose.  They love to occupy old termite mounds.  It was a pleasure to be able to observe them for a period of time more or less sitting relatively still without darting in and out of the mound.

DPP_4617DPP_4618DPP_4621DPP_4623DPP_4624DPP_4625DPP_4626DPP_4627DPP_4628

Olive baboons with youngsters playing, playing, playing.

DPP_4630

DPP_4631DPP_4632DPP_4633DPP_4634DPP_4635

Baby too young to play yet.

DPP_4636DPP_4637DPP_4638DPP_4640

These young baboons are quite busy watching other young baboons..

DPP_4642DPP_4643DPP_4644

Baboons this age always remind me of Doby the house elf!

DPP_4646DPP_4647DPP_4648DPP_4649

I’ll leave you with these penetrating eyes.  This seems long enough.  Might as well quit here and start another.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Serengeti, part 2

  1. Oh Nancy where do I begin. What a joy it is to be back in the Serengeti through your eyes.

    I have done it again and taken some numbers of the photos that have jumped out at me.

    Starting from the beginning and making my way through.

    4330 the zebra scratching it’s belly on the rock, what great timing.
    4332 and 4333, mother and foal- absolutely beautiful. I love the tails being flicked in the same direction.
    4408 this is just way too cute and 4427 a very healthy looking lioness.
    4485 and 4492, what a pleasure it is to see such beautiful photos of hyena.
    4535, a little unknown bird captured beautifully and I do believe you could be right about the Long Crested eagle and the Chanting Goshawk.
    4568, who would have thought a red-necked spur fowl could look so glamorous.
    4498 the mist covered landscape, fan-bloody-tastic. To be honest I think this would be my favourite shot.
    4590 the giraffe with his tongue wrapped around the twig, You were in the perfect position and perfectly timed.
    4643 and 4646 the baboons, again what magnificent photos.
    And finally the bat-earred fox – you are a very lucky lady to have seen so many together. I have only ever seen one on it’s own.

    What a fantastic trip you had and a beautiful location to have the camp situated. The Kopje and the boulders make for some wonderful photos.

    Many thanks Nancy for sharing, yet again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s