Samburu 2015 (again!)

These are the photos I missed when I was processing them.  It became glaringly obvious that I didn’t have any jpegs of the visit to the Samburu village.  But their dark skin against that harsh bright light made most of those photos look rubbish to me.  I had to lighten them considerably to see their faces which completely blew out the background.  Clearly, I have lots to learn about light and dark in photos!

Just pulling up to the village.  This is the village one (or both, I can’t remember now) of our guides came from.

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You can see that the roofs of their homes are pretty much made from whatever is available.  Definitely subsistence living.  They have donkeys and camels out grazing with the livestock.  They are used for carrying whatever is necessary, including water.  These villages are not permanent.  They need to be able to move when new grazing areas need to be found.

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Some of the people…

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I love photographing African children.  They are always so beautiful and have amazing smiles.  Since this visit is planned specifically for guests, the people are willing and tolerant of photos.  Otherwise, it’s considered rude and most adults do not want their picture taken although I’ve found most are willing to allow me to photograph their children.  This is not a cultural village.  This is their actual village.  I found this visit to a village far more real than previous visits to Maasai villages.

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This is part of the dance men do.  The jumping is the same as that of the Maasai.  They are separate and distinct tribes but call themselves ‘cousins’.  Although at first glance they seem the same, there are quite a few differences in the dress, their beadwork and their villages.  And probably many other customs I know nothing about.

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This jumping man was one of our guides.  I rode in his vehicle for the entire time in Samburu.  They are all such friendly welcoming people.

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A demonstration of their skill at making fire.  It really was quite impressive how quickly he was able to ignite a flame.

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The married women wear those large beaded necklaces.  They are quite heavy by the time you add a few.

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More lions…. this group were doing what all cats seem to do best.. SLEEP!  They would open their eyes for a bit but then they’d just slowly close again.

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These two have gorged themselves recently.  They were all belly!

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This elephant was munching away on acacia, eating the thorns as if they weren’t there.

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This cow was obviously doing a bit of babysitting in the shade on a very hot day.  At first all I could see was two calves but after the second one finally laid down I saw the third one. 

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A few more photos of the camp.  It was definitely unique!

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And yeah, there was a lot of walking to and fro.

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I included the following photo just as a way to see how vast, rugged and high the area around this camp really is.  If you look carefully, you can see a truck just below center (slightly left).  That’s a truck that hauls water daily to this camp.

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This is one of our stops for ‘sundowners’.  For those that don’t know what that is, the afternoon drives usually stop somewhere with a nice view of something for snacks and drinks before heading back to the camp.  It looks like daylight here because I bumped the ISO up so you could see the people.

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And this time, the sun went down spectacularly!

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And that’s it..for Samburu.

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2 thoughts on “Samburu 2015 (again!)

  1. Definitely a beautiful sunset, one I am sure you are pleased you were there for. I remember you writing on Facebook something about seeing a large pride of lions, was this the pride you were referring too? It’s a little hard to get some action out of lions when they spend so much time sleeping but if your patient, you can usually manage to capture something from their movements like you have.
    10490 is a great shot, I love the angle it was shot at.
    10595 the shot of the ellie in her babysitting role was the pick of the ellie photos for me. It is an all round nice photo, shows the setting well both elephants and landscape.
    I am glad you enjoyed your visit to the village. I have only been to one and it was at the Crater in Tanzania. I was very disappointed as it was there solely for the tourists, the maasai lived elsewhere, just came there for the day. It was nice to see the different colours and patterns in their dress from other parts of East Africa.
    I can see the issue you were having with the dark and light contrasts. I am not sure that I could have offered any suggestions. The Samburu tribe are very dark.
    Another great entry.
    I am afraid your trip must be nearing an end, then I have a long wait till your next one.

  2. The very large lion pride with so many cubs was in the Mara. So that comes next. I’ve also been to that cultural village at the Crater. The only really good thing about that is all their colorful clothing. The light was so harsh most of the time.

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