Maasai Mara 2015, part two

Before the buffalo showed up and the lions began to wander off, we spent quite a while watching all the interactions between cubs and the adults.

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Here’s papa still trying to wake up.

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And dad, who has been sleeping away the afternoon, attracted the attention of the younger cubs as soon as he got up to take a stroll!  Typical… mom does all the work and dad is still their idol!

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And there they go, following dad like the pied piper..

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While watching the lions, our guides got a report that there was a leopard in the area.  We took off as fast as possible over rocky rutted roads.  Soon enough we found this quite large male leopard.  Not that I’ve seen very many but this guy was huge.  He is apparently very well known.  He hasn’t been seen for several months so the guides were all delighted to see him again, fat and healthy.  He is the grandson of a famous leopard named Half Tail.  Her life has been documented in a book and she was featured in Big Cat Diaries.  He walked quite a ways right out in the open.  I haven’t ever seen a leopard this bold before.  Usually they live up to their reputation as elusive.  He was hardly that!  It was unforgettable!  He clearly has recently had a very large meal.

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Probaby far more leopard that you wanted but I just can’t get enough of him.

A couple of other creatures keeping a close eye on the leopard.  This is another dik dik.

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And an impala ram.

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Another series of lions and cubs.  Bad light and for some reason, I shot a series of photos in jpeg.  I have no idea why or how that came about.  But I’ve definitely learned that you really have much less to work with if you want to adjust white balance, contrast, etc.

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It’s pretty obvious everyone has over indulged at their last meal!

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This lioness is calling for other pride members.  This is the sound that travels great distances.  It is not the roar one normally associates with lions.  It is specifically a call to find other pride members.  I’ve always wanted to be near a lion when they did this, and I got my wish!

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More mating lions.  This goes on and on for several days.  All these photos are rubbish in my opinion.  They were also shot in jpeg, which I didn’t mean to do, and there’s not enough lee way to adjust light and color.  I can’t believe it went on so long before I realized it!

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This couple were pretty relaxed about the whole thing.  Usually there’s a lot of growling and spitting at each other.  Maybe this was the end of it and they were just too tired.

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This has turned out to be a cat blog I guess.  But that’s what the Mara is famous for.

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2 thoughts on “Maasai Mara 2015, part two

  1. It was worth the wait but you finally gave me cats. As you said, that is what the Mara is all about.
    Wow what a leopard, he is massive. Don’t you love the way he walked directly towards you but never looked at the camera. It is as though you were not there in his eyes and that’s the way it is when you are in a vehicle.
    Fantastic lions and cub interaction, so many great photos so I am not going to begin to start telling you which ones stand out.
    I did notice your problem where your photos are being cut off and to see them fully you need to click on the photo. I don’t have this problem with my photos. If you are using Live writer there is an option as to what size your photos are displayed at. Have you ever tried playing with this?
    Sadly and at the wrong place and time, you have found out why one should always shoot in RAW. I would love to know how you managed to change that without realising.
    Was all this lion and leopard action seen on one day or are these photos taken over a couple of days? How many days were you in the Mara?
    My final question, were there as many vehicles in the Mara as there are in the migration months?
    Great entry Nancy, I shall now hush post comment and go back for another look.

  2. We saw the lions one day for a short while and returned to spend more time with them and that is the same day we found the leopard. Hard to believe it was so much in one day. At least I think that’s how it went…
    I really don’t know how I ended up in jpeg but it is really frustrating!

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